North Pole ice-resistant self-propelled platform returns after sailing trials
25 May 2022

North Pole ice-resistant self-propelled platform returns after sailing trials

ST. PETERSBURG, May 25. The North Pole ice-resistant self-propelled platform finished the sailing trials in the Gulf of Finland, the Admiralty Shipyard’s press service said. "The Admiralty Shipyards have finished successfully the sailing trials of the North Pole self-propelled platform," the press service said. "The sailing trials, which took place in the waters of the Gulf of Finland, included checking the navigation certificates for communication, work of location and navigation systems. The company’s specialists have checked the operation of auxiliary diesel generators, the main diesel engine, service systems, auxiliary boiler systems and main ship units, and performed high-speed and maneuvering tests of the vessel." The North Pole will join the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute’s scientific-expedition fleet. The ensign would be flown in St. Petersburg in July and the platform will sail to Murmansk, and from there - to the maiden tour, scheduled for September, 2022. The Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute’s Director Alexander Makarov said earlier, the expedition’s first stage would continue for about six months - to February-March. The second stage would be longer, he added. The North Pole has a helicopter pad, the vessel’s displacement is more than 10,000 tonnes; the maximum term of autonomous work in terms of food supplies is one year, in terms of fuel - two years. The platform’s onboard scientific complex has 15 labs, a mobile field camp, which can be organized on ice floes. The platform’s team of researchers is 34 people. The national hydrometeorology service, Roshydromet, and the Admiralty Shipyards inked an agreement on building the North Pole platform in spring, 2018, the vessel was laid on April 10, 2019. The platform will replace the Arctic expeditions that Russia had to suspend in the early 2000s due to the global warming. Read more